My view on the ideal nation state – part 1

The ideal state should exist with the sole purpose of serving the needs of the people.

As the human population has grown, placing pressure upon limited resources, the need arose to organise, to resolve conflicts over access to resources in an efficient manner than constant conflict.  Nomads of hunter gatherers that roamed across the landscape in small family groups settled down to farm the land, evolving into tribes, then cities, then nation states. The group organised into roles, for example the king, priest and farmer.  Laws were made to define how each group related with the other, whilst artificial boundaries were constructed to denote where the authority of each nation started and ended.

A subject that has dominated the minds of philosophers, especially those of ancient Greece, has been the question of the ideal nation state.  Greece ran an experiment of different ways of government for hundreds of years amongst its many cities, and the fruit of this is a sadly not reflected today, a Greece that is enslaved to banks, its sovereignty impaired by being subject to the decision making of faceless foreign technocrats.

I agree with the idea of Aristotle that the teleological purpose of a nation state is to serve the needs of its people.  The nation thus should only act to benefit the people, and no action be taken that causes the people to suffer.  The Greece of today is forced by the bankers and foreign technocrats to make its people homeless, unemployed and hungry.  The situation of Greece of today is a far cry from the ideals of Aristotle.

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