More worker bees, less queens

Decision-making from the point of view of nature.

What is good for a bee is good for a decision-making structure in human society.

What is good for a bee is good for a decision-making structure in human society.

Nature has a teleological approach to its information processing and decision-making structures, clearly allocating functions to a hierarchy of units whether it is a group of cells in the body, a bee-hive or a wolf pack.  In the same way the effective running of a business requires there be only a few leaders, but a larger number of customer-facing workers to manage and meet the expectations of customers.

My town of Colchester is going through a review of the number of elected councillors that would best serve its needs.  Colchester council has a decision-making structure called a cabinet numbering only 8 of the 60 councillors, who make most of the important decisions, the rest of the councillors have little say in what goes on in the council.  From a business and natural point of view I think the cabinet-style of decision-making is good, as too many managers can wreck an effective organisation.  The Colchester cabinet is like the queen bee, and the rest of the councillors are like worker bees.

Like the worker bee the 52 councillors outside of the Colchester eight-strong cabinet have little say in the overall hive, but a hive cannot work unless there are a lot of worker bees to serve it.  The 52 councillors are important as the customer-facing lines of communication between a fast growing Colchester population and its central body the council; they are the eyes, ears, face and contact point between resident and council.  There are proposals to cut the overall number of councillors from 60 to 51, in an area that will jump from 176,000 to 207,000 population in a few years.  Some argue for leaving the number at  60, I went against everyone and entered an argument to the official review commission opposing any decrease in councillors, and increasing it to 69.

I come to conclusions based on what I see in nature.

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3 responses to “More worker bees, less queens

  1. “Like the worker bee the 52 councillors outside of the Colchester eight-strong cabinet have little say in the overall hive”

    Not sure I agree with this analogy. Actually a honeybee queen has little power in her colony. She’s extremely important to the workers as an egg-laying machine, but that doesn’t mean they won’t ‘ball’ her and bump her off if she’s not laying enough eggs. She’s only the queen as long as they want her to be the queen, and it’s the workers who make the decisions in the hive.

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