Tag Archives: think long term

Thinking across time

 An ancient game board helps me think long-term.

Today I observe living creatures benefit from my oak saplings, I would like living things benefit from them hundreds of years after my death.

Today I observe living creatures benefit from my oak saplings, I would like living things benefit from them hundreds of years after my death.

My oak saplings are two years old, the cat and a ladybird in my photos today benefit from their existence.  My dream, many hundreds of years in the future a child will benefit from shelter or play in the oak trees that my oak saplings will become.

My strategy in business and life is like a game, the oak saplings are parts in the greater game I play, actors that play out their parts hundreds of years after my death.  I recently abandoned a plan to situate these oak saplings in Pitchbury Wood in Colchester when the new owners of that wood revealed their stupidity and lack of care for the living things of that wood.  The new owner, like so many in the modern age, pursue short-term goals, turning the wood into a shooting venue, their conversion of the wood already inflicting great damage to the harmony and life of the wood.  Where I finally locate my oak saplings is part of the long game, one that will see those oak saplings thrive and benefit people hundreds of years from now.

I am the inventor of my interpretation of rules for a game board that was dug up by the archaeologists of my town, a Romano-British strategy game.  I think the game is the same one as described by the Celtic bards known as Fidchell or Gwyddbwyll, which means in the Celtic languages “wood wisdom.”  In the Celtic stories the game is one of the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, a game of destiny, a game played by princes, kings and heroes, that also features in the grail quest.  The archaeology suggests my ancestors  buried the game with a druid in Colchester.

This game board was dug up in a possible druids grave.  The people who play this game no are linking to a common thread of connection between their ancestors and their descendents, who may also play this game.

This game board was dug up in a possible druids grave. The people who play this game now are linking to a common thread of connection between their ancestors and their descendents in Colchester, descendents who may also play this game hundreds of years from now.

I feel like the Celtic hero in the story, I have taken something from the Celtic underworld, this game, something magical that links the past to the future, which unleashed for me a rollercoaster of challenges and opportunity, including this Liberated Way blog.  I am the custodian of a game played by my ancestors, the rulers of Colchester and Britain, a magical treasure; a game that I will bring back to life amongst the living, after hiding in the grave of a highly ranked druid of the first acknowledged King of Britain for two thousand years.

Again, I am thinking hundreds of years into the future, how to deploy the game of my ancestors that my descendents generations from now will continue to play in Colchester.  My Celtic ancestors lived outside of time, past, present and future linked in an unbroken living thread.  It is because of this game I no longer think short-term, and why my strategies build bridges between my ancestors and the future descendents in Colchester.

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