Tag Archives: working with nature

In harmony with nature

The individual can synchronise their life with nature.

Late June and the cherry trees are still yet to have ripe fruit.  I recognise that the climate is awry because everything is out of alignment, such as the UK cherry trees.  Most people fail to notice any of the natural patterns of nature because they are so separated from it.

Late June and the cherry trees are still yet to have ripe fruit. I recognise that the climate is awry because everything is out of alignment, such as the UK cherry trees. Most people fail to notice any of the natural patterns of nature because they are so separated from it.

It rains.  The cat runs inside, jumps on my seat, the warm secure shared space with me.  The cat is fully in harmony with nature.  When the rain stops, the cat will be outside again.  I know tonight the frogs and snails will be out in numbers, thus I am careful where I tread.

Yesterday was the Summer Solstice in Britain, the longest day.  Today marks the beginning of the slide into darkness and cold of winter.  I begin to think of preparing for winter.  I also mark my days by the moon cycles, I cut the lawn every new and full moon.  The last new moon, I decided to miss the cutting of the grass, because the growth of the grass had slowed and the clover were in bloom visited by hundreds of bees.

I have stopped feeding the birds, putting all the feeding stations in storage.  The summer and autumn are a time of abundance, and the nesting season is over.  I will begin again to feed the birds 1st November, the day that marks the first day of winter.

I no longer bother setting the alarm clock, I naturally wake up before 6am.  I tend to retire to bed before midnight, and mark time by the position and setting of the sun.

This weekend I will be going to a wild food fair to learn about bushcraft, foraging and making stone tools.

Bit by bit I work to live in harmony with nature, a gradual process.

On being mindful and responsible to living things

As a sustainable individual, acting in harmony with nature.

This impulsive cat seems oblivious to the possibility that I might trip over, step on or shuts doors on her; challenging me to practice mindfulness of her presence at all times.

This impulsive cat seems oblivious to the possibility that I might trip over, step on or shut doors on her; challenging me to practice mindfulness of her presence at all times.

The challenge of my cat, she is impulsive and acts on the viewpoint that I know where she is at all times.  Sadly, the reality is that I don’t, and the unfortunate possibility arises that I might accidentally harm her, such as step on her.

It is dark and raining, my cat is in the kitchen, I am at the front door, closing the door.  The cat suddenly has darted for the closing door; had I closed the door with any force, I would have killed my cat. Outside, the rain has brought out the snails and frogs.  I am fortunately mindful of where I am placing my feet, the frog survives, but the less easily seen snail dies, another accidental death by crushing of my feet.  In the dark, the cat lets out a little anxious meow as I kick her.  This is all a reminder of practicing mindfulness, the difference between life and death of the living things around me.

Yesterday I was camping.  A spider was crawling across my sleeping bag.  I attempted to evict the spider from my tent, but in the process discovered and caused the spider to lose a ball of eggs it was holding.  It is so easy to dismiss the spider and its loss of its eggs as insignificant, but to the spider, the loss of its young means everything.  I see the spider outside the tent silent and motionless, predictably the main item on its mind in that moment, the loss of its young.  I see the white ball.  I pick up and place the ball next to the spider, which immediately moves over the ball, gathering it up and running off to safety.

For the few that recognise and work towards action in harmony with nature in their daily lives, mindfulness born of awareness of the living things present  around them, and the responsibility to act in harmony with living things, is a good attitude to follow.

Working and connecting with nature

Ignorance and working against nature has harmful consequences.

Cows are dangerous.  Every year in the UK a walker dies because of their ignorance and lack of respect of cows.

Cows are dangerous. Every year in the UK a walker dies because of their ignorance and lack of respect of cows.

My ability connecting with nature is the result of seeing nature for what it is, and acting in harmony with nature.  The story of polar bears reinforces my point.

A student from my town of Colchester travelled with others to Svalbard Island in Norway known for its population of polar bears.  First ideal is knowing that polar bears are dangerous you keep away from their territories unless it is a matter of vital importance; these students went for the fun of it.  Second ideal is knowing the danger and being prepared for it; these students had no night watch, their trip alarm set in a triangle rather than a rectangle, their gun needed a paperclip to work.  A student died in a polar bear attack, and injured four other members of the expedition.  The polar bear died of its injuries.  Had people respected nature a polar bear and humans would have avoided death and injury.

The video below is about polar bears and huskies working in beautiful harmony.  The owner of the huskies respects the polar bears inherent wildness and works with nature, using fire crackers to educate the polar bears to keep their distance from him at all times.

Working with nature

Use nature to benefit you.

Of the original 13 I am now down to ten oak saplings, eight with leaves.  I am going to infect them with a beneficial fungus to improve their growth and survivability.

Of the original 13 I am now down to ten oak saplings, eight with leaves. I am going to infect them with a beneficial fungus to improve their growth and survivability.

Most people regard nature as the enemy they fight and control.  Few people are wise enough to work with nature, studying how nature works, then using the knowledge they learn for positive results.

I have ten surviving oak saplings, eight with leaves, two with roots but as yet no leaves.  I have discovered that there is a fungus called mycorrhizal fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with certain trees such as the oak, which help them obtain water in drought, boost their immune systems, helps them obtain nutrients from the soil, and even acts as a communication system between trees via the roots they connect to.  Oak trees supported by mycorrhizal fungi are resistant to disease and grow faster.

I shall this evening visit a local oak wood to obtain soil with the mycorrhizal fungus in it, then “infect” the soil in the plant pots which my oak saplings are growing in.  In theory I will use nature to assist in the survival and growth of my oak saplings.